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Healthier Honey Sesame Chicken (It's Baked!)

We all have our guilty pleasures, and mine is definitely honey chicken. When I stumbled upon this recipe I was so excited to see a healthier take on a classic. The only difference is that it is baked!
INGREDIENTS
1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1.5 inch pieces
kosher salt
ground black pepper
2 eggs, beaten
½ cup + 1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
Cooking spray
¼ cup honey
½ cup soy sauce (reduced sodium if possible)
½ cup ketchup
3 tablespoons brown sugar
¼ cup rice vinegar
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon minced fresh garlic
2 tablespoons sesame seeds
2 tablespoons sliced green onions
INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.Place the chicken pieces in a large bowl, season generously with salt and pepper. Add ½ cup cornstarch to the chicken and toss to coat thoroughly.
Dip each piece of coated chicken into the egg mixture, place onto a plate. Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil to the pan and half of the chicken pieces. Make sure that the chicken pieces are all in a single layer.
Cook the chicken until well browned, about 5 minutes, then flip the pieces and cook on the other side for another 5 minutes. Repeat the process with the remaining tablespoon of vegetable oil and other half of chicken.
While the chicken is cooking, combine the honey, soy sauce, ketchup, brown sugar, rice vinegar, garlic, sesame oil and tablespoon of cornstarch in a bowl.
Coat a 9x13 pan with cooking spray. Place the chicken pieces in a single layer in the pan. Pour the sauce onto the chicken pieces. Cook for 25 minutes until sauce is thick and bubbly. Garnish with sesame seeds and green onions.
8 Comments
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I wonder how that glaze would look on tofu!
@nannysally looks like short grain brown to me!
This look like a healthy dish! Are those brown rice or is it regular white rice?
It's amazing how switching to baked over fried changes everything about the dish! This is SO much better for you!
I know what I'm gonna have for dinner tomorrow.
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