vonchio
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Modern-day human slavery takes many forms

Watch three common scenarios about how people are duped into becoming human slaves. These three fictional people became human slaves when they were tricked into taking "jobs" that turned out not to be jobs at all. It's helpful for us all to understand how human trafficking works.
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It's really bad in some area. Kids are working in tin mills/mines. We're talking like aged 12. Really really bad. If you ever get a chance and I'll try to link it later, there's a report BBC Panorama did on Apple's work conditions in their factories in China and Malaysia. Really eye opening stuff.
@Spudsy2061 Nice, I'm gonna watch it now. Thanks for the links.
@drwhat The stories: http://www.bbc.com/news/business-30540538 & http://www.bbc.com/news/business-30532463 The episode itself (i recommend watching this quickly as stuff like this is usually taken down in a hurry): http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2df9zb_bbc-panorama-apple-s-broken-promises_tv
@Spudsy2061 I'd defintely be interested to watch that one.
There are many overseas workers who are being treathened and abused day to day by their employers. It is such a shame...
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