Cards you may also be interested in
This DIY Deadpool Pizza Is Pepperoni Perfection.
Chances are, if your friends are anything like my friends, everyone has yet to shut up about the new 'Deadpool' movie - so much so that I think it's safe to say that this month was definitely a Deadpool takeover. And thanks to this epic Deadpool pizza tutorial, your love affair with all things Deadpool is still officially far from over. If you thought his thing for good food begins and ends with chimichangas, think again. Here's what you need to make a Deadpool pizza of your own: - Pizza dough (The vlogger in the YouTube embedded below will show you how to make dough from scratch, or you can be like me and just buy the premade stuff.) - 1 jar of pizza sauce (I think so long as you've got at least a cup, it's enough.) - 1 package of shredded mozzarella (The 16-ounce package, so roughly 2 cups.) - 2 - 4 slices of mozzarella (This is for the eyes. Feel free to switch it up with provolone!) - 1 can of sliced black olives (I know some of you don't like olives, so if you can think of an equally delicious substitute to create his trademark black eyes, sub it here.) - 1 package of sliced pepperoni (Roughly 6 - 8 ounces should do!) Ready? Here we go. So first, you're going to preheat your oven to 450F. Then it's time to get that dough nice and spread out on your pizza pan, using a spoon to spread the pizza sauce all around the center of the pie. (Just, you know, leave the ends alone so you have a crust later. Pizza without crusts are super weird.) Next, you want to cover all of your sauce with some shredded mozzarella cheese. Don't skimp because this is going to help the pepperoni stay fixed to the pizza when you bake! Now it's time to layer on all of that pepperoni. Starting from the outside, work your way inward in a circular motion, laying the pepperoni down slice by slice. (If this isn't the most beautiful thing you've ever seen, you're in the wrong card. Dat pepperoni.) So in the video, she uses a teardrop-shaped cookie cutter to the primary shape before slicing it down the middle to create two eyes. I know I don't have teardrop cookie cutters at home, and you probably don't either, so feel free to use a knife to (carefully!) create the shape yourself! Now it's time to use the sliced olives to finish Deadpool's face. Keeping everything looking as symmetrical as possible during this step is key. Lay down your slices of olive similarly to how you laid down your pepperoni, and FINISH HIM!!! Throw him (gently) into the oven, and leave him there for about 10 - 15 minutes - or until he's nice and golden. Don't worry. It's Deadpool. He can take the heat. And there you have it: a Deadpool pizza - warm and gooey, just how you like him! For more specific instruction, check out Rosanna Pansino's full Nerdy Nummies tutorial in the YouTube above! And for more viral vids, follow my YouTube Nation collection! So who's going to try this out this weekend? (And more importantly, who's going to save me a slice?!)
History Continued
And you were 21 years old, you were just leaving childhood. The human brain does not fully develop until age 25. Then the decision-making part of my brain still needed training. There was no one to tell me what to do. You became the number one star in this business. Didn't he have royalties or rights to get some kind of reward for your popularity? None. None at all. In the video of the hijab, the most popular, three young people participate. You were one of them and you wore the Islamic scarf. You had to know how provocative that was. I literally told them that they will kill me. Why didn't you say you weren't going to do it? Intimidation. I was afraid. No one forces you to have sex, but I was still scared. Have you ever felt nervous about saying something in a restaurant when the food is not right and the waiter comes and asks "how is everything"? I was intimidated. Was nervous. You say that the concept of consent makes no sense in the dynamics of power between the men who control the porn industry and a young 21-year-old actress like you. Absolutely. When there are four white producers in the room and you tell them something like that, and everyone laughs, it's devastating and makes you not want to talk or say anything. It is the same when you sign your contract, you know the president and CEO of the company in the room, he is with you waiting for you to read it and when you are reading it you do not understand anything that is written, because you are very nervous, because people make you He is watching. When you left the filming set at the end of that particular movie, did you know deep down that this was going to be a disaster for you? He didn't hit me until the next day, because the adrenaline was still very high. But immediately after its launch, my whole world was shattered. The reason I thought it was good to do porn was because I thought nobody would find out. There are millions of girls who record themselves having sex and do things like that, and nobody knows their names. No one knows who they are. No one recognizes them that way. I wanted to do it as my dirty little secret, but it exploded in my face. Khalifa says he assumes 100% responsibility for having participated in the porn industry, which he considers today to be a mistake. From the point of view of filmmakers and distributors, it was a triumph. They said I was like lightning that fell into a bottle. The reality for you was that your face was known throughout the world as the porn star wearing hijab and suffered threats. Oh yeah. I will not say about EI, because I don't think everyone who is very involved with EI has a Twitter account. They put a picture of me on someone who was beheaded and said ... I don't know exactly what they said. They said something that would be next. I can't imagine how alone you must have felt at that moment, because you couldn't discuss this with your family. No. It was scary. But my mechanism to deal with these things is humor. So my answer was: "Well, as long as you don't cut my tits. They are worth a lot of money." You were 21 years old. Now five years have passed. How much personal responsibility do you assume for what you did? The 100%. I made the decision. Of course the industry is imperfect and we must do something to protect other girls so they don't fall into the same trap as me. But it was my choice. Going out of business when that viral video was so well known and associated with something so provocative, and you received the threats ... Was it a very quick decision for you? I wouldn't say very fast, because I was still nervous. I didn't know how to react to that. In fact, I summoned them all at a meeting a month later and I had a resignation letter for each one and told them about my feelings. They tried to convince me to stay and they told me that all this would happen and that I was safe, that I was exaggerating. Then these guys saw you frankly as a money machine. Absolutely. Do you think you suffer some type of post-traumatic stress from this experience? Yes. And I think it is activated mainly when I go out because I feel that people can see through my clothes and I feel very ashamed and it makes me feel like I have lost all my privacy. Because I am on a Google search. The suicide of porn actress August Ames at the end of 2017 led some female colleagues to protest their situation and the pressures they face. You have no right to delete the images, even if they are deeply personal to you. It is very difficult. It is. This story is your story. But frankly, it's also the story of other porn actors and actresses. Honestly, I started to realize that p agoOco. People started communicating with me. My manager checks emails and when he receives things like that, he filters them and sends them to me. Reading the words of some of these girls who have been trafficked and forced into pornography, all these stories of girls whose lives have been ruined (...) makes me feel that it was good to start talking and to do this interview. Consecutive deaths of 5 porn actresses who set off alarms about the harsh conditions of the adult entertainment industry in the US There is a school of thought that says that in many countries young people are so exposed to pornography that it is changing the way men and women interact. What do you think? Of course it affects relationships. Porn addiction is very frequent. The things that men see in the videos are expected of women in their lives, and that is not the reality. Nobody is going to be so perfect, nobody will do those acts on a Wednesday night. If you could talk to that 21-year-old girl, Mia Khalifa, walking down the street in Florida, stopped by the boy who said, "You are beautiful, lovely. I can work with you," what would you tell her to do today? There is a pepper spray of gas in your bag for a reason. Use it. Run!
Breaking Up and Blue Valentine
Six months ago, I left the longest relationship I've ever had (six years) and it all started with Derek Cianfrance's Blue Valentine. One night, a year or so before the actual break-up, I thought it would be a good idea to watch Derek Cianfrance's Blue Valentine (2010) on Netflix. We both like Ryan Gosling -- as a human specimen and as an actor -- and we thought we'd enjoy it. As it went on, my ex started complaining that the movie was dragging on. She couldn't get into it and kept calling the movie weird, while I was thoroughly enjoying it. By the time the final scene came on (the scene posted above), she was asleep on the couch. The way Cianfrance cross-cuts between the past and the present lets the viewer experience two different timelines simultaneously. As the past and present mirrored each other (in the past they were crying out of joy while the present they were crying about their separation), I started to feel like that was going to happen to my relationship. I thought about our beginning and eventual end the same way Cianfrance had laid it out on the screen in front me. I met my ex outside of a Dunkin Donuts across the street from my house. They were with a friend of mine and needed a cigarette, "Reds, huh? You a tough guy or something?" my future ex asked me in a playful tone. I laughed and handed one over. We talked over black coffee and through wisps of smoke. As the night went on, we made plans to see each other again in two days. I remember feeling so nervous that I was late to pick them up. I chain-smoked two cigarettes as I pulled up to their house and honked the horn. When they walked through the door, I felt stunned. I couldn't believe this person -- I was so into them at the time -- was into me. I screamed a little bit in my head. We went to a Starbucks, sat in the parking lot, and drank ice coffees under the sun. This became our thing. We drank coffee, smoked, got drunk at night, and watched movies. And without any warning, it was decided. We were dating. And I was happy. Things started feeling off after we hit the two year mark in our relationship. At times, it felt like we were going through the motions. We barely went out to eat, we didn't watch new movies, we stopped going out to see bands play, and we rarely touched each other (all of these things could probably be attributed to my own problems, though). Everyday, we'd go to work or class, come back home, then fake our way through conversations until it was time to go to bed. Later, she got annoyed at me because I move too much in my sleep, so I'd push myself up against the wall and out of the way. Eventually, I bought an air-mattress that we put in our bedroom so I wouldn't bother her anymore. This was pretty analogous to our relationship. We were in the same room but we weren't really together. About six months ago I broke up with her in middle of the night. I watched a person -- a person I once loved -- fall apart in front of me. Last weekend, I tried to watch Blue Valentine again. I barely paid any attention. My mind was elsewhere. As I listened to the movie, I saw different visuals in my head. I saw our relationship being built. Like a castle or a fort or a giant skyscraper. I heard our laughter. I remembered all the nights we stayed out late. I recalled the first time we told each other that we loved one another. I saw our smiles but then I saw them turn into frowns. The castle/fort/skyscraper was being taken down. Bricks fell from the foundation until it crumbled. I relived the night we broke up. I felt all of the emotion she did. I felt everything I didn't feel when I was watching her plead and beg with me to change my mind. The way Cianfrance constructed the beginning and end of a relationship -- in this movie -- will never sit well with me. And that's what makes it a great film. My relationship ended with Blue Valentine. And I don't think I'll ever watch it again because of what it represents. I don't how my ex is doing or what my ex is doing now. But I hope they're doing well.