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Timothy's Tower Cakes

To call these wedding cakes towering is actually a major understatement. These cakes are epic. They're majestic. They're stunning!
From the master cake designer himself, Timothy, of Timothy Cakes, his Indonesian confections have shown up across the globe! Just because he's international doesn't mean you can't have him whip something stunning for your wedding!
Look at the size of this thing compared to the bride and groom!
Which of these is your favorite? Can you believe how insanely large these cakes are?! How many guests could these cakes feed? how much did it cost? How much did the wedding cost? WOW!...
For cake ideas that are about 3-4 tiers in size, check these out!
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Some Firecrackers You Can Eat - Filled With A Pop Rocks 'BANG'!
Whether it's Memorial Day, Labor Day, or the 4th of July, I love patriotic summer holidays because it's one of those occasions where everyone gets together and shares a whole lot of food. (In my family, it's always when the recipe-swapping happens!) One of my friends actually drew me into this recipe when they made it for one of those aforementioned parties last year! These red, white, and blue mini cakes are adorable as they are, but it's the Pop Rocks surprise in the middle that really seals the deal! Adapted From She Knows MAKES 10 - 14 MINI CAKES First, you'll begin by creating three sheets of cake - one in red, one in white, and one in blue! Start by mixing the box of white cake mix, the egg whites, oil, water, and sour cream together in a bowl for about 3 - 4 minutes on medium speed. Once you're done, split the cake batter into three equal amounts, adding red and blue food coloring to two of the three portions. Coat three 4 x 9-inch bread pans with cooking spray and lightly flour the bottoms. Add the three batters to the pans, put them in the oven, and bake them at 350 degrees F for 18 - 23 minutes. Allow the finished cakes to cool, and remove them from the pans. Once the cakes are fully cooled, use a 1 1/2-inch round cookie cutter to cut circles from each of the baked cakes. (Depending on how close you're able to punch out holes, you should be able to make anywhere from 10 - 14 mini cylinders per color!) This is also the part where you'd discard the rest of the unused (and strangely Lego-looking) cake sheets. You can do this by throwing it out, eating it yourself, or pawning it off to some impatient kids! Using a serrated knife, carefully trim off the browned, baked bottoms of each cake circle. (Again, trash or kids. You won't be needing these bottom parts later!) Using a jumbo straw or a plastic tube about 1/2 - 3/4" in diameter, remove the centers of the cake circles. Be sure to save the red and blue centers because you'll be using them as plugs for your filled firecracker cakes later. Put a portion of the red cake plugs back into the bottoms of the red cake circles. Pipe a line of frosting around the centers of the red and white cake circles. Stack the white cakes on top of the red cakes, then the blue cakes on top of the white cakes to build your general red, white, and blue firecracker shape. Carefully load the Pop Rocks into the hollow centers of the stacked cakes. Put a portion of the blue cake plugs back into the tops to seal the center filled with Pop Rocks. Cut the licorice rope into 'fuses' that are approximately 1 1/2" long, and finally, insert them into the centers of the blue cakes. And you're done! For maximum popping potential, pour the Pop Rocks into the cake centers no earlier than one hour before serving. The moisture in the mini cakes will cause the Pop Rocks to slightly snap and crackle on their own. But after about four hours, the Pop Rocks will lose most of their popping power, so make sure to plan accordingly!
Red Velvet Goes Naked
You can call this a Valentine wedding cake or simply the best vision of red velvet gone naked that you will ever see! Photographed by Cape Town and destination wedding photographer, Jilda G, you can see just how visionary this cake really is! You've got the hot naked cake trend happening, plus the bliss of all that rich decadent red velvet cake that's been iced with just-as-epic cream cheese frosting! OH MY!!!!! Keep scrolling to see Alton Brown's FIVE STAR recipe via Food Network! Ingredients 13 1/2 ounces powdered sugar 12 ounces cream cheese, room temperature 3 ounces unsalted butter, room temperature 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract Pinch kosher salt Directions Using a stand mixer, combine the cream cheese and butter on medium speed, just until blended. Add the vanilla and salt and continue beating. On low speed, add the powdered sugar in four batches, beating until smooth. Refrigerate for 5 to 10 minutes before using. Recipe courtesy of Alton Brown, 2011, via Food Network Not feeling cake for your wedding (or for Valentine's Day)? Then make something just as magical: Red Velvet Cheesecake Cookies! This comes from a fellow Vingler, @popcoco98. Click here to be directed to the recipe automatically! For all my beauty queens out there, I'd like you to take a break from the makeup (for just a second) and get hyped for these babies. Tagging you because there is a STRONG correlation between loving makeup and loving red velvet treats. LOL @jordanhamilton @kaminisingh @TessStevens @mikayla @ChelseaHeyes @QueenYuki @KyotieWolf @Donnas @ImUrBestFriend @galinda @Bekka @RaquelArredondo @jazziejazz @rmayra1 @prgurl4u2envy @DemiP @alannasofia
32 Things You Didn't Know About Weddings
I'm not big into fancy weddings, but I LOVE learning about traditions in other parts of the world. Check out these 32 facts and traditions! Good Luck and Bad Luck 1. Wear a sugar cube tucked in your gown...according to Greek and Persian culture, the sugar will sweeten your marriage. 2. In English tradition, Wednesday is considered the "best day" to marry, although Monday is for wealth and Tuesday is for health. 3. Saturday is the unluckiest wedding day, according to English folklore. Funny -- it's the most popular day of the week to marry! 4. Rain on your wedding day is actually considered good luck, according to Hindu tradition! 5. For good luck, Egyptian women pinch the bride on her wedding day. Ouch! 6. Middle Eastern brides paint henna on their hands and feet to protect themselves from evil. 7. Peas are thrown at Czech newlyweds instead of rice. 8. A Finnish bride traditionally went door-to-door collecting gifts in a pillowcase, accompanied by an older married man who represented long marriage. 9. Moroccan women take a milk bath to purify themselves before their wedding ceremony. 10. In Holland, a pine tree is planted outside the newlyweds' home as a symbol of fertility and luck. It's Got a Ring To It 11. Engagement and wedding rings are worn on the fourth finger of the left hand because it was once thought that a vein in that finger led directly to the heart. 12. In the symbolic language of jewels, a sapphire in a wedding ring means marital happiness. 13. A pearl engagement ring is said to be bad luck because its shape echoes that of a tear. 14. One of history's earliest engagement rings was given to Princess Mary, daughter of Henry VIII. She was two years old at the time. 15. Snake rings dotted with ruby eyes were popular wedding bands in Victorian England...the coils winding into a circle symbolized eternity. Fashionable Lore 16. Queen Victoria started the Western world's white wedding dress trend in 1840...before then, brides simply wore their best dress. 17. In Asia, wearing robes with embroidered cranes symbolizes fidelity for the length of a marriage. 18. Ancient Greeks and Romans thought the veil protected the bride from evil spirits. Brides have worn veils ever since. 19. In Japan, white was always the color of choice for bridal ensembles...long before Queen Victoria popularized it in the Western world. 20. In Korea, brides don bright hues of red and yellow to take their vows. 21. Brides carry or wear "something old" on their wedding day to symbolize continuity with the past. 22. In Denmark, brides and grooms traditionally cross-dressed to confuse evil spirits! 23. The "something blue" in a bridal ensemble symbolizes purity, fidelity, and love. Food and Family 24. In Egypt, the bride's family traditionally does all the cooking for a week after the wedding, so the couple can relax. 25. In South Africa, the parents of both bride and groom traditionally carried fire from their hearths to light a new fire in the newlyweds' hearth. 26. The tradition of a wedding cake comes from ancient Rome, where revelers broke a loaf of bread over a bride's head for fertility's sake. 27. An old wives' tale: If the younger of two sisters marries first, the older sister must dance barefoot at the wedding or risk never landing a husband. Show Off at a Cocktail Party 28. In many cultures around the world, including Celtic, Hindu and Egyptian weddings, the hands of a bride and groom are literally tied together to demonstrate the couple's commitment to each other and their new bond as a married couple (giving us the popular phrase "tying the knot"). 29. The bride stands to the groom's left during a Christian ceremony, because in bygone days the groom needed his right hand free to fight off other suitors. 30. On average, 7,000 couples marry each day in the United States. 31. Valentine's Day and New Year's Eve are the two busiest "marriage" days in Las Vegas...elopement central! 32. Bachelor parties were first held by ancient Spartan soldiers, who kissed their bachelor days goodbye with a raucous party. Do you have any interesting wedding traditions in your family?