Gavriella
2 years ago1,000+ Views
Resort 2016 Trend: Bold Ruffles
This upcoming resort season, ruffles are dominating the runway, and not in the pretty-pretty-princess way you might think. Oversize ruffles cascade dramatically across shoulders, torsos, and legs within the garments of so many designers. Get ready to try this trend come November! See who featured this trend, and how, below.
Above picture is from Maticevski's Resort 2016 collection.

Erdem

Despite Erdem Moralıoğlu's generous use of ruffles in his resort collection, there is nothing saccharine about these pieces. In fact, the starchy ruffles and leathery accents give the whole collection a badass vibe.

Maticevski

Toni Matičevski's ruffles are breathtaking in that he lets them speak for themselves. Ruffles are no longer the accent or the hem of a garment; they ARE the garment in Maticevski's resort collection.

Givenchy

Riccardo Tischi emphasized volume in his latest collection for Givenchy, complete with oversized ruffles, bell sleeves, and giant pleats.

Ellery

Australian label Ellery has been working under the surface, but I have a feeling they're about to break through the fashion scene, especially after the crisp lines and starchy ruffles of their resort collection.

Rosie Assoulin

Brand new CFDA winner Rosie Assoulin has been known for voluminous ruffles, but she took hers to a 70s place with her resort collection, complete with tie-dye and bell sleeves.

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney has been known for fresh but girly collections, and she took this to a new level with her clean white and nude pieces for resort 2016 that are elevated with oversize pleats and ruffles

Lanvin

Though Alber Elbaz's ruffles for Lanvin's resort collection are noticably softer than the aforementioned designers', the bright colors and neo-80s shapes make the ruffles more statement than sweet.
2 comments
I wish I understood haute fashion terms! Why is it called a "resort collection," @Gavriella? Are these things meant to be worn on vacation?
2 years ago·Reply
that's a good question, @allischaaff! It's basically just an interseasonal collection between the two major seasons (spring/summer and fall/winter) that designers use to experiment a bit more and show some extra lines, but they call it resort because it's holiday season. I guess the people who can afford the clothes are also the only people who can afford to travel to resorts each season.
2 years ago·Reply
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