DaniaChicago
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Lifesize Jenga - DIY

A short while ago I shared a DIY to make corn hole toss games, which are super popular here in the midwest, and elsewhere too, I'm sure, which you can read about here. But I wanted to bring back another fun game that everyone loves--perfect for Summertime--Jenga!

Materials

(6) 8-foot long 2x4s
Circular Saw
Sand Paper
Level
12ร—12 (or larger) Cement Patio Brick
Large Plastic Storage Bin
*Paint and Sealant (optional if you want it cute and fun looking)

Step 1

Cut each 2ร—4 into nine 10.5 inch* pieces. This will yield 54 total blocks to be stacked in 18 rows of 3.
(If you make mistakes like I do, then you may want to buy one extra board...just in case.)

Step 2

Sand all the rough parts of the cut pieces. Don't go nuts, just make them splinter-free!
*This is the part where you'd add paint and sealant if you wanted these to be cute looking.

Step 3

Use a level to find a FLAT part of the yard to play this. This is what the 12 x 12 cement patio paver is for: to make a flat and level place to play.
Now you're ready to play the game! Have fun with it. When you're done, simply store the pieces in a plastic durable container away from the elements. Get one with handles so you can easily unload it from your car if you take it to the park to play this summer. In fact, have you seen my other summer projects? Click here!
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