alywoah
4 years ago1,000+ Views

Being Afro-Latino: Shit We're Tired of Hearing

In one of my other cards, I gave a crash course on how "Latino" is not a race. So now that you know that there is such a thing as afro-latino, let's talk about the shit that Afro-Latinos or Black Latinos are sick of hearing. Okay ¡dale!

"You Don't Look Latino"

Dude, what the hell are we supposed to look like? Do you have any idea how big Latin America is? And how many different cultures are in Latin America? You know how Europe has all these different countries, that have different cultures, and varied physical traits? Yeah, think of Latin America sorta like that. Someone from Mexico may look different from someone who is from the Dominican Republic.

"You're not a REAL black person"

What's a "real black" person, anyway? Is it a dark-skinned person who is from The United States? From Libya? Jamaica? Or from London? Black people inhabit every inch of this earth. We have many different languages, cultures, appearances, and experiences. Yes, there's black people in Latin America. So you tell me who and what region defines what a "real black person" is...

"You're not REALLY Latino"

Alright, so I am not really black and I am not really Latino. I guess I am a Mutant Ninja Turtle who lives underground and eats pizza. Not saying that wouldn't be cool -- because that would be. But I am not a turtle. We are both Latino AND Black.

"Do You Consider Yourself Black or Latino?"

Why do we have to choose? Why can't we just be both? Because we are both. Just like someone can be South African and white. Or English and black. Where you're from is different to your race.
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damn this is a great series. I totally feel your frustration even though i can't empathize on a personal level. nice work!
This card is gold. Ps. Mulatas are my weakness 😍
Good question, @Esha. Puerto Rico is part of Latin America. Latino is someone from Latin America. For example, it's like a Korean from Asia. They are Korean, but they are also Asian.
That stuff is totally annoying. Can we all just be human for let's see forever! I get tired when people ask me stuff like "oh you don't look this or Oh you don't sound that way" you know what I sound like Lydia that goes by LA, gets road rage, bleeds the same color.. At the end of the day, I'm just American trying to live out my nerd dreams with other nerds lol! But @alywoah I do love your card lol 😁
I don't understand why anyone needs to be categorized in any way, we're all humans, and you are whatever culture or background you identify with. People are people, all with their own unique blend of traits which make them, uniquely them. I really detest when people try and 'reject' people who identify as the same cultural background, because something doesn't quite meet their own narrow criteria of what makes somes gay or straight, asian, black, white....whatever it might be. You would think that they would have learned from the discrimination they experience, not to inflict more prejudice on others.
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