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Best Dog Food for Rottweilers

If you’ve ever been around a Rottweiler, then you know that while they might physically look intimidating, deep down inside they’re really lovable sweethearts. This breed of dog has earned a well-earned reputation of being fiercely loyal to their owners and being excellent guard dogs. Rottweilers also have high levels of intelligence, which is why they’re deployed in search and rescue missions, or when it comes to herding sheep. When you have a dog that possesses all of these qualities, the question to ask is: “What do you feed it?” A vet Aurora, CO vet takes some time to share the best dog food for Rottweilers. Physical Needs Rottweilers are stout, muscular creatures that typically weigh anywhere between 75 to 130 pounds. Due to their larger frames, they tend to fill out more as they get older. This puts more importance on their diets; what you feed them when they’re younger will affect them as they get older. If you have any more questions about your precious Rottweiler’s physical needs, take your dog to the local veterinarian Aurora, CO. Count Those Calories The experts at a veterinary clinic Aurora, CO will tell you that keeping your Rottweiler’s calorie levels under control is extremely important. Normal daily calorie intake for an average-sized Rottweiler that weighs 90 pounds is 2100. Dogs who have been neutered or spayed will not require as many calories, and neither will older dogs, due to their decreased activity levels. On the other hand, younger puppies that are still physically growing and highly active need extra calories to provide fuel for their bodies. Do not be surprised if you hear that some young Rottweilers consume 1870 calories on a daily basis. If you have questions on how many calories your beloved Rottweiler should be consuming, be sure to consult your nearest animal hospital Aurora, CO.
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Tetanus in Dogs

You’ve heard of tetanus before—it’s the disease you need to get a shot for after stepping on a rusty nail, right? That’s correct, although the truth is that tetanus can occur from any kind of deep wound, whether it’s a nail or something else entirely. And our canine friends, too, are at risk of tetanus. Read on as your vet Downey, CA tells you more about tetanus in dogs and how you can keep your canine companion safe. What causes tetanus? The Clostridium tetani bacteria causes tetanus when the spores of the bacteria enter the body through a wound. This bacteria is commonly found in dust and dirt, as well as in fecal matter. As the spores die off inside your pet’s body, they produce a neurotoxin known as tetanospasmin. This toxin is the root danger of tetanus. Talk to your veterinarian Downey, CA for more information about tetanospasmin and the C. tetani bacteria. A dog could get tetanus if they have an open wound or sore and then come into contact with matter infected with C. tetani bacteria. Puppies tend to pick up items with their mouths, and could accidentally cut themselves. For this reason, young dogs tend to get tetanus more often. And dogs that live on farms or spend a lot of time outdoors are at a higher risk, too. Check with your vet clinic Downey, CA to see if your dog might be at high risk for tetanus. What are the symptoms of infection? Tetanus is also called lockjaw because of its main symptom: stiffening of the neck and jaw muscles. Other symptoms include rigid legs, muscle spasms, drooling, hypersensitivity to touch, light, and sound, difficulty eating or drinking, fever, and respiratory trouble. Without treatment, seizures and even paralysis can occur. Let your veterinarians Downey, CA know immediately if you spot these symptoms.
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Did You Know Pets Can Get Yeast Infections?

You might be surprised to learn that pets can get yeast infections, just like humans. This infection is caused by a fungus, and infections are considered opportunistic. This means that infections occur—and can recur—when ideal conditions are present. Read on as your veterinarian Gresham, OR goes over the basics of yeast infections in pets. Cause of Yeast Infections Yeast infections are caused by Malassezia pachydermatits, a species of fungal yeast that is found normally on pets’ skin and in their ears. It thrives in sebum, the oily discharge that comes from a pet’s sebaceous glands. That’s why areas of the body with the most sebaceous glands—the armpits, inner thighs, groin, face, and ears—are the most susceptible. Talk to your vet Gresham, OR to learn more about sebaceous glands and Malassezia yeast. Often, yeast infections occur secondarily to other underlying health issues. Allergies, seborrhea (dandruff), and ear infections are just a few examples. Ask your veterinary clinic Gresham, OR for more insight into these conditions. Note that while a yeast infection can occur in any pet, certain breeds seem to be predisposed to the condition. The canine group includes the Bulldog, Basset hound, Cocker spaniel, West Highland White terrier, Scottish terrier, Australian terrier, and the dachshund. Feline friends predisposed to yeast infections include the Persian and Himalayan breeds. Ask your vets Gresham, OR if your particular type of pet might be predisposed to yeast infections. Symptoms of Yeast Infections
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Why Does My Dog Keep Scooting?

Have you ever seen your dog scoot before? This behavior is characterized by your dog putting their rear end on the ground and scooting along the floor with their front legs. As silly as it looks, it might mean there’s something more going on than a simple itch. Scooting is often a symptom of health problems, especially if it keeps reoccurring! Read on as your veterinarians Plano, TX tells you why Fido might be doing this. Impacted Anal Glands Your dog has two small glands located on either side of their rectum, underneath the base of the tail. These glands are squeezed when your dog has a bowel movement, and they produce a foul-smelling liquid that coats your dog’s feces. This scent is used by your dog as a kind of identifier to other dogs. Learn more about the function of the anal sacs by calling your vet Plano, TX. It’s possible for your dog’s anal glands to get full with the liquid, clogging the duct that releases it. When this happens, it’s known as impaction. The gland swells up, causing your dog discomfort. Fido tries to relieve that discomfort by scooting his butt along the ground. Your veterinarian Plano, TX will need to manually drain the glands if this is the case. Infected Anal Glands If impacted anal glands aren’t drained, they can become infected. This can lead to redness, inflammation, pain, and even an abscess. (An abscess is a swollen, pus-filled lump.) If your dog’s anal glands become infected, your pet clinic Plano, TX will need to prescribe antibiotics and perhaps anti-inflammatory medications. The abscess may also need to be drained.
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Inhaled Pet Poisons

We spend a lot of time thinking about keeping our pets protected from environmental toxins. Things like toxic foods, poisonous plant life, and medications all pose a threat to our animal friends. And taking steps to keep your pet away from those things is very important. (Ask your veterinarian Columbia, MD for some tips on preventative measures.) But there are other kinds of toxins out there, too, and they can prove even more dangerous: inhaled pet poisons. Toxic fumes can’t usually be seen by you, Fido, or Fluffy’s owner. So, you might not be aware that danger is even present. Read on as your vet Columbia, MD tells you more about inhaled pet poisons and how you can keep your companion safe. What kind of inhaled pet toxins are out there? Ammonia and bleach, commonly used for cleaning, can give off noxious fumes that aren’t safe for pets. The chlorine of backyard pools, hot tubs, or spas is another example. Additionally, smoke from campfires or burn piles can give off dangerous levels of smoke, especially if you’re burning plastic or certain other materials. Talk to your veterinarians Columbia, MD to learn more about each of these poisoning possibilities. Carbon monoxide poisoning is another dangerous possibility for your pet when it comes to inhaled poisons. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas created when carbon fuels aren’t completely combusted. Usually, pets are affected when they’re trapped in a garage with a car engine turned on. Talk to your vet clinic Columbia, MD to learn more about carbon monoxide poisoning in pets. What are the symptoms to look for?
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Salmon Poisoning Disease in Dogs

Salmon Poisoning Disease, or SPD, might sound strange. But it’s a very real disease that can affect our canine friends with potentially life-threatening consequences if it isn’t dealt with. And yes, it involves salmon, as well as other fish that swim upstream, such as trout. Allow your veterinarian Aurora, CO to clear things up below: How do dogs get SPD? Salmon Poisoning Disease can occur if a dog eats raw salmon, or other fish like trout that swim upstream. These fish might contain a parasite called Nanophyetus salmincola. This parasite itself doesn’t do any harm to the fish, or to the dog that eats it. However, the parasite itself can be infected with a rickettsial microorganism called Neorickettsia helminthoeca. It’s this microorganism that is the cause of SPD. Talk to your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO for more information on this disease process. Salmon and other fish that swim upstream are most common in the Pacific Northwest. For this reason, dogs in this region are at the greatest risk for contracting Salmon Poisoning Disease. Ask your vet Aurora, CO if your dog might be at risk for this issue based on where you live. What are the symptoms of SPD? The rickettsial organism enters your dog’s intestinal tract after the contaminated fish has been eaten. From there, it spreads to other areas of your dog’s body. Symptoms may not appear until a week or more after your dog was first exposed to the microorganism. To learn more about the Neorickettsia helminthoeca organism, call your veterinarians Aurora, CO.