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«Clitoris», «vagina» and «uterus» are sexist terms...

You thought the intimate parts of the female body were free and independent? Wrong. By the terms chosen to define them, they too are the embodiment of patriarchal domination... For more inspiration you can visit TheToy. If you're interested in the female body, you'll be delighted to learn that it's a territory in which man obviously couldn't help playing the sexual explorer geographer by naming his own private parts as if they were virgin land to be conquered. As a result, the names of mythological gods or old white anatomists are now squatting all over the area of the female pelvis. For this reason, more and more organizations and personalities such as the Australian physicist Leah Kaminsky or the professor of cognitive sciences Lera Boroditsky (University of California, San Diego) are campaigning to change the names of female private parts. Last summer, the highly recognized and followed healthline.com, an American medical site, proposed in its turn a sex guide in which some genitals were renamed to be more inclusive. The idea? To sound the death knell for gender stereotypes and the dominance of the male in the body of medical knowledge, because as the American sexologist Kenna Cook said in an article for the Bustle site in January 2018: "Sex words in anatomy are meant to reinforce heteronormativity and an idea of sex-based solely on reproduction." A little anatomy tour that shows it might be time to consider serious renaming. 1. The clitoris The name of the most misunderstood and misunderstood appendix in history comes from the ancient Greek kleitoris: that is to say what is used to close, a lock or key. In her study "De l'anachronisme et du clitoris", from the collective work Le Français préclassique (published by Champion, 2011), the professor of literature Michèle Clément explains: "The Greek verb "cleitoriazein" and the noun "cleitorida" already appeared in Rufus of Ephesus [a renowned Roman physician] in his treatise Du nom des parties du corps humain (around the 1st or 2nd century AD), and in his treatise Du nom des parties du corps humain (around the 1st or 2nd century AD), the Greek verb "cleitoriazein" and the noun "cleitorida" already appear in Rufus of Ephesus [a renowned Roman physician] in his treatise Du nom des parties du corps humain (around the 1st or 2nd century AD).C.); he mentions both words when he calls the "shameful parts of women.""